FAQ’s

/FAQ’s
FAQ’s2018-03-29T07:08:54+00:00

Our practice hours are from 8:30am to 5:00pm, Monday through Friday.
Appointments for our surgeon can be made by telephoning our practice at 713-486-3900.

HiP FAQs

It is very common to experience swelling after surgery. Everyone is different, sometimes the swelling will take several days to develop. Remember that your body is healing from surgery and swelling is normal. The more active you are and the more exercise you perform, the more swelling you may experience. We want you to be active and follow your exercise instructions within reason. However, if you are experiencing increased swelling and discomfort it may mean you are doing too much or not elevating your leg enough. You can decrease the swelling by elevating your surgical leg above the level of your head and using ice. This should be done 3-4 times a day for 15 minutes at a time or more.

You should call our office if you have swelling that is accompanied by redness and heat, or if the swelling does not resolve after elevating properly. after elevating properly.

Yes, most people have will have some bruising after surgery. It may only be around the incision, but it may also involve the entire leg. Both are considered normal and will resolve over 10-14 days with proper care.
No, I do not restrict my patient’s range of motion. However, the physical therapists and nursing staff may tell you to avoid extending the leg and turning your foot outward in combination. While I don’t require these restrictions, there is no harm in following them.
You may put as much weight as feels comfortable on your surgical leg after surgery unless told otherwise. Most patients will use an assist device, i.e. a walker, crutches or cane for the first few weeks after surgery. Becoming independent from assist devices is usually directly related to how debilitated and deconditioned you were prior to surgery. If you have used a walker, crutches or cane for a long time before surgery be patient and take your time to make sure you are strong enough and stable enough to walk independently. Typically we recommend that you continue them until we are certain you are safe.
All patients are provided with a joint replacement handbook with very specific instructions on activity level and exercise that we expect you to rely on. That being said, everyone is different. You should slowly increase your activity level every day, but let your discomfort and swelling be your guide. It is not uncommon to experience setbacks if you do too much too soon. When this occurs do not be discouraged, adjust your level of activity and make sure you rely on rest, ice, compression and elevation your to decrease the swelling.
Most patients have some trouble sleeping after joint replacement surgery. Make sure that your discomfort is being controlled and follow the guidelines in the handbook for managing swelling and bruising. Sleep during the day may make it harder to sleep throughout the night. A small percentage of patients will continue to have some difficulty sleeping that may be treated with medicine on a temporary basis.
Long prior to surgery you should be adjusting your diet to help achieve the best outcome possible. These recommendations can be found in the guidebook and joint class. You should start increasing dietary fiber and maintain good hydration well before surgery. Protein intake should also be increased to handle the stress of surgery and to help with the healing process. Stool softeners and/or motility agents should be started a few days before surgery and continued until your bowel habits normalize after surgery. All narcotic pain medications have constipation as a side effect, so it is important to continue these recommendations until they are no longer needed. If your constipation continues you can take Milk of Magnesia, or Senekot which are mild oral laxatives. Magnesium Citrate, which is much stronger, can be used if the previously mentioned medicines don’t work. Suppositories or Fleet’s enemas may also be considered. All of these medications can be bought over the counter at a pharmacy.
You can shower the day after surgery. Your incision will be covered with a waterproof dressing that is intended to stay on until the first follow up visit. Most patients can take a bath or go swimming after 3 weeks.
Don’t use a hot tub or whirlpool for four weeks.
You should wear them until your first follow up visit. Before this, wear the stockings during the day. You may remove them at night. The stockings should be worn on both legs after surgery.
You may sleep in any positon that feels comfortable. Many patients feel most comfortable sleeping on their side with a pillow between their legs during the first month of recovery.
We recommend resuming all of your regular prescriptions, vitamins and supplements after discharge from the hospital.
Bruising and swelling after surgery is normal. Small amounts of clear yellow, pink or bloody drainage may be normal too. Contact the office if you have a large amount of drainage that has saturated the waterproof dressing, if the drainage looks like pus, if you have a temperature of 101.5, or if you have a sudden increase in pain that is not controlled by your pain medications and printed guidelines.

You should take antibiotics before the following procedures:

  • ANY dental procedure, including teeth cleanings
  • Sigmoidoscopy/colonoscopy
  • Any infection
  • Tonsillectomy
  • Bronchoscopy
  • Liver biopsy
  • Genitourinary Instrumentation
  • Prostrate and bladder surgery
  • Kidney surgery
  • Vaginal exams and GYN surgery
  • Barium enema
  • Fever above 101.5° consistently
  • Increased drainage or swelling
  • Pain not controlled by pain medication
  • Inability to bear weight on your operative leg
  • Severe insomnia
  • Swelling in foot or calf that is accompanied by coolness or decreased sensation in foot
  • Confusion/ disorientation

KNEE FAQs

It is very common to experience swelling after surgery. Everyone is different, sometimes the swelling will take several days to develop. Remember that your body is healing from the surgery and some swelling is normal. The more active you are and the more exercise you perform, the more swelling you may experience.

We want you to be active and follow your exercise instructions. However, if you are experiencing increased swelling and discomfort it may mean you are doing too much or not elevating your leg enough. You can decrease the swelling by elevating your surgical leg above the level of your head and using ice. This should be done 3-4 times a day for 15 minutes at a time or more.
You should call our office if you have swelling that is accompanied by redness and heat, or if the swelling does not resolve after elevating properly.

Yes, most people have will have some bruising after surgery. It may only be around the incision, but it may also involve the entire leg. Both are considered normal and may take several weeks to resolve.
No, in fact I recommend working on range of motion through self-directed exercises throughout the day. Alternating extension and flexion exercises with elevation and icing will make the recovery process proceed smoothly.
You may put as much weight as feels comfortable on your surgical leg after surgery unless told otherwise. Most patients will use an assist device, i.e. a walker, crutches or cane for the first few weeks after surgery. Becoming independent from assist devices is usually directly related to how debilitated and deconditioned you were prior to surgery.
All patients are provided with a joint replacement handbook with very specific instructions on activity level and exercise that we expect you to rely on. That being said, everyone is different. You should slowly increase your activity level every day, but let your discomfort and swelling be your guide. It is not uncommon to experience setbacks if you do too much too soon. When this occurs do not be discouraged, adjust your level of activity and make sure you rely on rest, ice, compression and elevation to decrease the swelling.
Most patients have some trouble sleeping after joint replacement surgery. Make sure that your discomfort is being controlled and follow the guidelines in the handbook for managing swelling and bruising. Sleep during the day may make it harder to sleep throughout the night. A small percentage of patients will continue to have some difficulty sleeping that may be treated with medicine on a temporary basis.
Long prior to surgery you should be adjusting your diet to help achieve the best outcome possible. These recommendations can be found in the guidebook and joint class. You should start increasing dietary fiber and maintain good hydration well before surgery. Protein intake should also be increased to handle the stress of surgery and to help with the healing process. Stool softeners should be started a few days before surgery and continued until your bowel habits normalize. All narcotic pain medications have constipation as a side effect, so it is important to continue these recommendations until they are no longer needed. If your constipation continues you can take Milk of Magnesia, or Senekot which are mild oral laxatives. Magnesium Citrate, which is much stronger, can be used if the previously mentioned medicines don’t work. Suppositories or Fleet’s enemas may also be considered. All of these medications can be bought over the counter at a pharmacy.
You can shower the day after surgery. Your incision will be covered with a waterproof dressing that is intended to stay on until the first follow up visit. Most patients can take a bath or go swimming after 3 weeks.
Don’t use a hot tub or whirlpool for four weeks.
You should wear them until your first follow up visit. Before this, wear the stockings during the day. You may remove them at night. The stockings should be worn on both legs after surgery.
You may sleep in any positon that feels comfortable. Many patients feel most comfortable sleeping on their side with a pillow between their legs during the first month of recovery.
We recommend resuming all of your regular prescriptions, vitamins and supplements after discharge from the hospital.
Bruising and swelling after surgery is normal. Small amounts of clear yellow, pink or bloody drainage may be normal too. Contact the office if you have a large amount of drainage that has saturated the waterproof dressing, if the drainage looks like pus, if you have a temperature of 101.5, or if you have a sudden increase in pain that is not controlled by your pain medications and printed guidelines.
Knee replacements are made of metal and plastic and it is normal for clicking to occur after surgery. It is often more noticeable in the early phases of recovery after surgery. As the swelling decreases and the healing process matures the clicking may become less noticeable.
Kneeling will not damage the prosthesis, however it is common for kneeling to be uncomfortable in the beginning. Patients should wait until they feel nearly recovered before kneeling. This usually requires 2-3 months. I recommend placing a cushion or folding a blanket under your knee to help minimize the pressure on the knee.

You should take antibiotics before the following procedures:

  • ANY dental procedure, including teeth cleanings
  • Sigmoidoscopy/colonoscopy
  • Any infection
  • Tonsillectomy
  • Bronchoscopy
  • Liver biopsy
  • Genitourinary Instrumentation
  • Prostrate and bladder surgery
  • Kidney surgery
  • Vaginal exams and GYN surgery
  • Barium enema
  • Fever above 101.5° consistently
  • Increased drainage or swelling
  • Pain not controlled by pain medication
  • Inability to bear weight on your operative leg
  • Severe insomnia
  • Swelling in foot or calf that is accompanied by coolness or decreased sensation in foot
  • Confusion/ disorientation